ODDS, ELEVEN DIPTYCHS I FOUND INTO MY MIND

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ODDS, ELEVEN DIPTYCHS I FOUND INTO MY MIND

Odds, Eleven Diptychs I Found into My Mind
Remomero Gallery
Skyline building,  Beirut, Lebanon
22 June - 5 August 2017

 

 

The destiny of images lies in the principle that produces them. That principle is in the disruptive force of the double, creative and tyrannical at the same time. It needs a kind of zen exercise to create a vacuum in our mind where to be able to recognize it. It needs a zen ironic approach of our mind to escape from its paralyzing hug. The 11 diptychs, acrylic on canvas by Remo Ciucciomei are that exercise, trying to get a side glance at the double, playing with the second life of the images after their disappearance, when they are just archaeological fragments in our mind.  

You can visit it anytime up to August 5th, in between 6.30 to 9.00 pm. Entrance is free, yet it would be good to announce arrival. Gallery address isSky Line building, Block A, Floor 14, Mar Mikhael 

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Alina Tenser and Chris Domenick: Bonded Warehouse

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Alina Tenser and Chris Domenick: Bonded Warehouse

Alina Tenser and Chris Domenick: Bonded Warehouse

helper Projects

495 Rogers Avenue, New York

June 24 - August 11, 2017

Upon entry of goods into the warehouse, the importer and warehouse proprietor incur liability under a bond. This liability is generally cancelled when the goods are:

    • exported; or deemed exported;
    • withdrawn for supplies to a vessel or aircraft in international traffic;
    • destroyed under Customs supervision; or
    • withdrawn for consumption domestically after payment of duty.

The sense of anticipation in something hidden. There are many examples of this and I won’t list any here. The object can be inaccessible or otherwise off-limits, there is something left to the imagination. You may be put in a position that requires action, without action the situation will never be resolved. There is the possibility of failure, but full resolution, although not guaranteed, is impossible without action. Without action, however, you succeed by not failing.

(There are always exceptions and I am thinking of one person in particular who knows this is all a ruse and will tell you as much. But he plays both sides.)

Two lines intersecting in the form of an inverted T. The lines are of equal length. They say most people interpret one line as longer than the other and whether you live in a rural environment or urban one your perception of the lines are different, that you are more or less inclined to perceive the lines as equal in length. The most common interpretation is that the vertical is the longer one.

The box anticipates, contents supine, leathery.

-Wan Cologne

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Take Back The Fight: Resisting Sexual Violence From The Ground Up

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Take Back The Fight: Resisting Sexual Violence From The Ground Up

Take Back The Fight: Resisting Sexual Violence From The Ground Up

Interference Archive

131 8th Street, #4, New York

June 1 – October 29, 2017

Recovery from trauma after sexual assault is often imagined as a personal, internal experience. However, anexclusive focus on individual narratives of victimization and healing can obscure decades of collective, grassroots struggle by and on behalf of sexual assault survivors. Rape is not an isolated experience, but a pervasive form of violence that acts in concert with oppression in the workforce, at home, and in medical and academic institutions–as well as with structural racism, homophobia, transphobia, and capitalism. Likewise, organizing against sexual violence is intimately linked to struggles for liberation in both public and private spheres. The history of organizing against sexual assault and rape helps us to understand feminist resistance to violence as a collective struggle against patriarchy, and sexual and gender violence as a function of state violence.

Interference Archive’s summer 2017 exhibition Take Back the Fight: Resisting Sexual Violence from the Ground Up focuses on organized responses to gender and sexual violence, highlighting the ways individuals and communities have developed creative and powerful grassroots and non-institutional justice and healing practices. A collaboration with Lesbian Herstory Archives, Take Back the Fight narrates intersecting histories of activism by and on behalf of survivors of sexual violence and their communities. The exhibition will coincide with a series of public events in order to collectively engage with the exhibition material, relating the histories presented to ongoing efforts to end and heal from sexual violence.

Archival materials in this exhibition are primarily drawn from the collections of the Interference Archive and Lesbian Herstory Archives. Taken as a whole, these documents reveal both the breadth of organizing against sexual violence and its fragmented, conflictual history, echoes of which continue to be felt in contemporary feminism. The exhibition makes visible some of the fault lines that developed between activists: the pornography debates of the “Sex Wars,” the limits of single-issue organizing, and conflicts and tensions around whether to work within state institutions or develop community-centered justice models.

Archival materials will be complemented by materials created by contemporary artist/activists. These will include a quilt from The Monument Quilt, an evolving collection of stories from survivors of rape and abuse; Bordados (embroideries) by the organization Bordamos Feminicidios based in Mexico created in response to feminicide; and a new installation by intergenerational healing village Harriet’s Apothecary.

This exhibition will situate multiple histories of resistance to sexual violence within a broader narrative of feminist, anti-racist, and queer activism. It will present strategies of resistance, both historical and contemporary, looking at the ways in which activists have sought justice outside of the courts and the criminal justice system. Ultimately, Take Back the Fight will demonstrate the crucial role of grassroots organizing in the struggle against sexual violence and the importance of this activism as a tool of both healing and resistance.

Take Back the Fight is organized by Lani Hanna, Louise Barry, Melissa Forbis, Monica Johnson, and Rachel Corbman. Please contact info@interferencearchive.org with questions about the exhibition, or for class tours.

This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

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The Mere Future

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The Mere Future

The Mere Future

American Medium

424 Gates Ave., Brooklyn, New York

June 23 - August 6, 2017

The Mere Future is an exhibition examining the relationship between artistic production and the erosion of the public sphere. In varying ways, the seven artists in this exhibition take the urban landscape as emblematic of the constellations of social and economic power that undergird the art world.

The exhibition looks in particular to one of the unexpected but well-documented legacies of post-conceptual practices and institutional critique—namely, that reflexivity to the politics of representation, audience and display is thoroughly compatible with contemporary art’s role as one of the main financial engines behind the catastrophic transfers of wealth from the private to the public sector over the past three decades. With art’s corruptibility firmly in mind, The Mere Future presents work that negotiates complicity with the potential for renewal and the possibility of a new commons.

At a moment when the President of the United States is an ex-property developer, many of the exhibition’s works carry explicit or implicit traces of New York City’s voracious real estate market. Devon Dikeou presents a sculpture she first showed in 1992, a replica of one the planters in the lobby of Trump Tower. Joel Dean’s sculpture cartoonishly probes the affects of the city’s architectural marvels, locating them on a continuum between power and submission. Nils Norman contributes a series of plans for a proposed redevelopment of Battery Park City, including a redesign of Richard Artschwager’s public art piece “Sitting Stance” as a gentrification advice kiosk, presented here for the first time since they were shown at American Fine Arts Co., New York in 1999. The Half Moon Bay Center for Theatre and Performance Art’s new commission is a mumblecore-inspired short film depicting a young artist navigating the depressingly predictable economic and social realities of the New York art world.

The two drawings contributed by Stephen Kaltenbach, executed in 1970, escape the city, seeming to depict suburban and country homes, but finding hierarchies of taste equally entrenched there. Amy Lien and Enzo Camacho explore the circulation of cultural capital in the ever-shrinking loop between center and periphery in a series of photographs of the traditional Filipino dish, champorado, taken at a well-known cafe in the bohemian-artistic/eco-touristic Baguio City, Philippines. Finally, Marc Kokopeli references Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree series with his own version, virtually unchanged from the original, a melancholic acknowledgement of a political imaginary in stalemate as much as a call to reconstruct the future.

The exhibition borrows its title from Sarah Schulman's prescient 2009 novel about liberal hubris, whose dystopic vision of New York City, where all social problems have finally been solved, suggests the provincialism bound up in fantasies of urban progress.

Joel Dean (born 1986) lives and works in New York City. He graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a Bachelors of Fine Art in 2009, and co-founded Important Projects in Oakland the same year, helping to oversee the space’s program through 2014. He has had solo and two-person exhibitions at Species, Atlanta (2016); ISCP, New York (2016); Weekends, London (2016); Princess, New York (2015); Lodos, Mexico City (2014); and Jancar Jones, Los Angeles (2013). 

Devon Dikeou is an artist, editor/publisher of zingmagazine , and co-founder of the Dikeou Collection, based in Denver. She lives in Austin, Denver, and New York City. She has exhibited her work at the New Museum, the Contemporary Austin, Artpace San Antonio, FLAG Art Foundation, NADA, the Armory Show, the Independent, James Fuentes, 179 Canal, Moore College of Art, MAMCO, and the Bronx Museum, among many other venues. Later in June, she will open a show at James Fuentes in New York. Dikeou received an MFA from School of Visual Arts, New York and an undergraduate degree from Brown University. 

Half Moon Bay Center for Theatre & Performance Art comprises Rafael Delacruz, Marc Matchak and Quintessa Matranga. Established in 2005, the group creates films depicting nihilism and humor in the artist life. Their work, in testing the aesthetic parameters of omphaloskepsis, attempts to taunt audience preconceptions of artistic and social ontology. Operating largely between California and New York City their output would not be possible without a grant from the city of Half Moon Bay and equipment donations from various public media outlets. 

Stephen Kaltenbach (born 1940) is one of the most important and prolific figures in American conceptual art. He was featured in landmark group exhibitions organised by the movement’s foremost advocates – Seth Siegelaub ( March , 1969), Harald Szeemann ( Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form , 1969), and Lucy Lippard (955,000, 1970) – as well as presenting solo exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art (1969) and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1967). 

Kaltenbach’s work was included in other definitive exhibitions of conceptual and minimal art including: 9 at Castelli , Castelli Warehouse, New York (1968); 557,087 , Seattle Art Museum (1969); and Information , Museum of Modem Art, New York (1970). Since the 1970s, Kaltenbach’s work has been included in many conceptual art surveys including 1965–1975: Reconsidering The Object As Art , Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1995); Under the Big Black Sun , Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2011); ENDS OF THE EARTH: Land Art to 1974 , MOCA, Los Angeles (2012) and Haus der Kunst, Munich (2012); When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013 , Prada Foundation, Venice (2013); Materializing “Six Years” : Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art , Brooklyn Museum (2013). 

Marc Kokopeli (born 1987) is an artist based in New York City. 

Amy Lien (born 1987) and Enzo Camacho (born 1985) are artists and writers who work collaboratively on projects in the U.S., the Philippines, and in Germany. In 2014, they both received M.F.A.s from the Hochschule für bildende Künste, Hamburg, and both graduated magna cum laude, from Harvard University, Cambridge (Camacho in 2007, Lien in 2009). Their work has been exhibited at Kestner Gesellschaft, Kunstverein Hannover, Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hannover; Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing; Jim Thompson Art Center, Bangkok; USC ROSKI School of Art and Design, Los Angeles; Kunstvlaai 2012, Amsterdam; and Manila Contemporary, Makati. They have also performed at the MoMA, New York, and published in Texte zur Kunst and Flash Art. In 2013, they received the DAAD/Karl H. Ditze Stiftung Achievement Grant Award. Lien and Camacho are represented by 47 Canal, New York.

ils Norman (born 1966) is an artist living in London who works across the disciplines of public art, architecture and urban planning. He has completed major public art projects in Roskilde, Denmark and Bristol, UK, and has designed playgrounds in Bristol, UK and Cardiff, Wales. Norman has developed commissions for Museum De Domijnen, Sittard, the Netherlands; Western Front, Vancouver, Canada; Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfallen, Düsseldorf, Germany; SculptureCenter, New York; Creative Time, New York; the London Underground; the Tate Modern, London, and participated in the 50th Venice Biennale. He has also had solo gallery presentations at Galerie Christian Nagel, Germany; American Fine Arts, Co., New York; Friesenwall 120, Cologne; and with Stephen Dillemuth at Vilma Gold, London and Reena Spaulings, New York.

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Sarah Fuhrman: Complex Possessed

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Sarah Fuhrman: Complex Possessed

Sarah Fuhrman: Complex Possessed

Slag Gallery

56 Bogart St, New York

July 7 – August 13, 2017

Sarah Fuhrman’s paintings circle around issues of ecology, observational play, and the study of human behavior.  In recent works, she has been pouring paint in order to create specific ambiances or birds’ eye views of landscapes, which resemble satellite images. These poured landscapes allow chance and happenstance to infuse the work process, as they rarely reference specific geographical locations. After spending time with the pours of paint, Fuhrman allows both the intellect and the subconscious to direct her, and subsequently the viewer, through a journey of narrative, dream like spaces. Fuhrman sources contemporary socio-political events from various readings, and content from but not limited to design movements, symbolism, retro-kitsch, ornate patterns, and all manner of textures running the gambit from seductive to grotesque. Over time, these renderings allow Fuhrman to implant an array of traumatic, ecstatic, or spectacular multi-ethnic friezes in a surreal and quirky world. The combination of such a vast array of curated forms and spaces results in destabilizing the viewer and prompting experiences of inter-personal memories, places, and active figuration. The viewing of the work also turns simultaneously topographical and inclusive while questioning screen culture, visual pleasure and play.

Sarah Fuhrman received an MFA from SUNY Purchase School of Art & Design in 2015.  Fuhrman has exhibited in multiple group shows including Select Art Fair in Chelsea, the Mohawk Hudson Regional in Albany, New York, Fuchs Project Space, Green point Gallery, Momenta Art, September Gallery and Slag Contemporary. In this past year alone she has also been awarded scholarships and residencies by the Ora Lermann Charitable Trust, The Vermont Studio Center, and Azule Artist’s Retreat in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Fuhrman lives and works in Highland Park, Brooklyn.

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Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., Again

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Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., Again

Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., Again

Socrates Sculpture Park

32-01 Vernon Boulevard, New York

April 29 – September 4, 2017

Socrates Sculpture Park is pleased to present New York’s first institutional solo exhibition of Nari Ward (b. Jamaica; lives in New York). The exhibition, Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., again, features a series of six newly commissioned outdoor artworks that were created on site and on view April 29 – September 4, 2017. The opening celebration will take place on Saturday, June 3, from 3-7 PM.

Ward recasts tropes of outdoor structures – the monument, the playground, lawn ornaments, architectural barriers, and the advertising sign – into surreal and playful creations. Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., again examines how hubris creates misplaced expectations in American cultural politics. This exhibition also brings new insight into the artist’s exploration of identity, social progress, the urban environment, and group belonging.

G.O.A.T. is an acronym for Greatest of All Time, a phrase commonly used in American sports, made famous by Muhammad Ali, and in hip-hop, most notably, as the title of Queens native LL Cool J’s best-selling album. The title alludes to the African-American experience and political theater – common themes in Ward’s work.

The figure of the goat features prominently in Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., again as the artist’s articulation of social dynamics, conjuring the animal’s attributes and symbolic connotations, from an ambitious climber of great heights to an outcast. A flock of goats cast from lawn ornaments traverse the landscape, both in groups and as solitary individuals, manifesting the show’s title. The appropriation of the word goat, turning an insult into a moniker for excellence, demonstrates the power of wordplay, while the modifier again implies historical repetition. Scapegoat, a forty-foot long hobby toy further develops the goat metaphor and highlights another strand of the show: the satirization of virility, masculinity, and monument.

The visual anchor of the show is Apollo/Poll, a towering sign that reads ‘APOLLO’, the letters ‘A’ and ‘O’ blinking on and off to spell out “POLL.” The red LED-lit letters echo that of the iconic neon beacon hanging over Harlem’s Apollo Theater, a renowned venue for African American musicians and entertainers. Ward imagines the sign as a reflection on the enterprise and art of self-promotion, performance, originality, and the meaning of communal acceptance.

Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., again spans Socrates Sculpture Park’s five-acre landscape as the Park’s first presentation of a single artist in its 30-year history. Ward, who transforms discarded or familiar materials into formal innovations that address society’s most urgent questions, underscores the Park’s mission of integrating contemporary art into daily life and as a space for cultural exchange and transformation.

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Visible Range

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Visible Range

Visible Range

Deli Gallery

10-16 46th Avenue, New York

July 14 – August 6, 2017

The exhibition examines the multifaceted and multifunctional ways that artists employ rainbows within contemporary art. The works included display not only the optical range of color as seen by humans, but also explores the concept of turning something invisible visible.

With over two years of one person exhibition programming, "Visible Range" will be Deli Gallery's first group exhibition. Please join us for a special evening!

Artists in this group show: Lukaza Branfman-Verissimo, Camilla Engström, Brook Hsu, Haley Josephs ,Amy Li, Paul Metrinko, Keiko Narahashi, Eva O'Leary, Adam Sultan, Richard Tinkler.

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Maureen Gallace: Clear Day

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Maureen Gallace: Clear Day

Maureen Gallace: Clear Day

MoMA PS1

22-25 Jackson Ave. at the intersection of 46th Ave., New York

April 9 – September 10, 2017

For more than 25 years, Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has painted genre scenes drawn from the American landscape and still life traditions. Her small canvases and panels most commonly depict rural pastorals and coastlines, typically featuring nondescript barns or cottages amid dunes and foliage in settings that evoke holiday cards and vacation snapshots.

Gallace’s paintings, however, unsettle the reassuring sentimentality of such pictures. Situated on sunny bluffs and among verdant yards, her buildings can appear at turns inviting and inaccessible, sometimes lacking doors or windows. Paths meander through lush gardens, but may also lead the viewer astray; infinite ocean vistas collapse into shallow, intimate compositions. From the outset, Gallace has deployed a range of abstract tools to complicate the romantic enticements of her subject matter, giving rise to a quietly remarkable body of work. This exhibition features the largest group of Gallace’s paintings yet assembled.

While her paintings often begin in reference to specific places that she has visited or known, Gallace deftly transforms her subjects into composites of different memories and forms, many of which repeat in variations throughout her work. Both familiar and impersonal, her art reflects a desire for beauty and solitude while inviting us into a broader meditation on our common culture. Whose bucolic landscape is this? And, for that matter, who lives here?

Gallace avoids narrative description of her work. “The house doesn’t mean anything per se,” she has said, “It’s an empty vessel.” But her uninhabited scenes touch upon deeper questions of belonging and ownership that shade the idealism of American history and contemporary life. In their modest domestic scale, her paintings serve as anti-monuments for an era of “too-big-to-fail”; her obdurate homes punctuate the shortening horizons and factional regionalism of a changing and divided America. The shadows are crisp on a clear day.

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Nicholas Faust - Dance And Language: Expanded Choreography Now! Debt And Healthcare

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Nicholas Faust - Dance And Language: Expanded Choreography Now! Debt And Healthcare

Nicholas Faust - Dance And Language: Expanded Choreography Now! Debt And Healthcare

Meyohas

43-01 21st Street,Suite 223B, New York

June 30 - August 10, 2017

Student debt and healthcare in America are both related to a specific breed of American capitalism. It is the same impulse that lets people rack up huge hospital bills and choose between bankruptcy and death that also requires people to get advanced degrees and then forces them to spend the rest of their lives paying for it. This exhibition by Nicholas Faust is a dual portrait of America, via the student loan crisis and the larger issue of healthcare, using the AIDS epidemic as told from a hemophiliac point of view. Faust invokes court cases, rewrites legislation, and stages performances in public sites to measure and memorialize. His dances function directly as action and engagement, and pedagogically as a means of resistance.

Nicholas Faust was born in 1989 and is an artist, choreographer, curator, writer and activist based in New York City. He has written for Art in America, New Inquiry, DIS Magazine and others. He is a founding member of Graphics and Visual Tactics, a public art group spawned from ACT UP committed to projects concerning the societal issues of HIV. He is a founding member of Match Cuts, a monthly screening series dedicated to programming activist videos, video art, and Decolonial/LGBT/dance/sex/Marxist cinema in New York. The show at Meyohas and accompanying book, Dance & Language: Expanded Choreography Now!, is his first solo presentation in New York. 

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Andy Brown & Gabriel Hurier: Heavy Merge

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Andy Brown & Gabriel Hurier: Heavy Merge

Andy Brown & Gabriel Hurier: Heavy Merge

Sardine

286 Stanhope Street, Ground Floor, New York

July 8 - July 30, 2017

Heavy Merge combines the vision of Andy Brown and Gabriel Hurier, two friends and collaborators, in a gallery for the first time. The title, borrowed from a construction sign near the I-84 bridge in the Hudson Valley, is meant to describe a confluence of weighty ideas and freer flow abstractions. The show is anchored by four large scale spray paintings of an imaginary southwestern desert (Brown) and encroached upon by dozens of imaginary celestial objects hanging from the lights and ceiling (Hurier). Smaller individual pieces by each artist will fill the space. Heavy Merge invites the viewer to walk into another world with another sky, an escape into two artists’ minds.

Andy Brown was raised and is now based in Phoenix, Arizona. Exploring wall art and large scale outdoor murals inspired by the passage of time and the desert, Brown is inspired by Sonoran Desert topography and the Saguaro cactus. He has travelled and shown his work extensively throughout the USA and in Japan. Currently he is transitioning to a more abstracted pace within his art works. While he is excited to bring the desert in room-size scale to Sardine with Hurier, Brown will also be showing smaller works, the foundation of his art practice.

Gabriel Hurier was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and lives and works in Newburgh, New York. He has participated in numerous group shows in the New York area including Gallery 128, ATM Gallery, Matteawan Gallery and has shown in Chicago, San Diego, Cincinnati, Zagreb, and Singapore. Hurier has had two solo shows at Sardine (2012/ 2014), Bushwick, Brooklyn. He is currently exploring naturally occurring shapes and rethinking the inescapable cycles of life as a traveler and a father. His work often utilizes everyday materials leftover from 13 years of realizing wall drawings for Sol LeWitt. He studied painting and printmaking at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. 

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Kaari Upson: Good Thing You Are Not Alone

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Kaari Upson: Good Thing You Are Not Alone

Kaari Upson: Good Thing You Are Not Alone

New Museum

235 Bowery, New York

May 3 – September 10, 2017

In works that encompass drawing, sculpture, video, and installation, Los Angeles–based artist Kaari Upson (b. 1972, San Bernardino, CA) tracks circuitous narratives that weave together elements of fantasy, physical and psychological trauma, and the often-fraught pursuit of an American ideal. Her objects give form to the collective desires, neuroses, and vulnerabilities that haunt the subconscious of popular culture. This presentation, the first New York museum exhibition of Upson’s work, brings together a selection of recent projects by the artist, which interconnect in a web of phantasmagoric images, ideas, and associations.

For over a decade, Upson’s projects have taken a near-forensic approach, drawing inspiration from abandoned archives to uncover a body of projected histories, images, and artifacts. For her series MMDP (My Mother Drinks Pepsi) (2014–ongoing), the artist investigates the interdependent relationship between herself and her mother. Comprising sculptures of fossil-like, aluminum-casted Pepsi cans, videos filmed among the aisles of Costco, and over one hundred stuffed dolls dressed in the artist’s mother’s everyday outfit, MMDP explores the desire for consumption as it is trapped in cycles of mass production. Alongside this series, the exhibition debuts a new body of work that centers around a family living in a tract house in Las Vegas. Incorporating drawings, a video (“In Search of the Perfect Double” (2017) ), and cast sculptures including a hearth—the traditional focal point of the American home—Upson explores the unnerving similarities and slight incongruities evident among these bulk-manufactured dwelling spaces on subdivided land.

In her intricate drawings, corporeal domestic sculptures, and meandrous videos, Upson navigates a hall of mirrors found within the vessel of our homes, revealing that private and public, inside and outside, self and other are fluid concepts, with the potential of becoming one and the same. The title of the exhibition alludes to the reality that none of us is actually born alone—we cannot help but reflect our entrenched histories, both inherited and experienced.

“Kaari Upson: Good thing you are not alone” is curated by Margot Norton, Associate Curator, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated publication.

Kaari Upson was born in 1972 in San Bernardino, California, and lives and works in Los Angeles. Her works have recently been included in the group exhibitions “Adhesive Products,” Bergen Kunsthall (2016); “The Los Angeles Project,” Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing (2016); “Sleepless: The Bed in History and Contemporary Art,” 21er Haus, Vienna (2015); “No Man’s Land: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection,” Miami (2015); “Test Pattern,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2013); and “The Residue of Memory,” Aspen Art Museum (2012).

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From A Whisper To A Scream

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From A Whisper To A Scream

From A Whisper To A Scream

Lehmann Maupin

201 Chrystie Street, New York

May 25 – September 1, 2017

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to present From a whisper to a scream, a group exhibition featuring work by Teresita Fernández, Jeffrey Gibson, and Shirazeh Houshiary. The artists in this exhibition all draw from the visual vocabulary of Minimalism in their use of industrial materials, deliberate restriction of form, and engagement of physical space, but do so in order to communicate social, political, and cultural meaning in a way that the 1960s movement always resisted. Through painting and sculpture, each artist transforms this typically self-referential genre into one that speaks as loudly as narrative imagery. There will be an opening reception at the gallery on Thursday, May 25, from 6-8 PM.

Teresita Fernández (b. 1968, Miami, FL; lives and works in Brooklyn, NY) creates vast abstracted landscapes of minimal color and form that attempt to capture how we experience our surroundings, and how we define our environments in relation to identity and citizenship. For this exhibition, Fernandez will present 3:37 p.m. (2001), a wall installation composed of hundreds of acrylic cubes in seven colors of the light spectrum, a reductive representation of a rainbow captured at a specific moment in time, 3:37 p.m. Fernández’s work is characterized by an interest in perception and the psychology of looking, so she encourages the viewer to conjure up his or her own personal associations with the landscape, which in turn become part of the meaning behind the work.

Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972, Colorado Springs, CO; lives and works in New York) assimilates influences such as indigenous art and craft, politics, music, fashion, urban subculture, and art historical references to create paintings, sculptures, and beaded tapestries infused with layers of historical, social, and formal content. The six works included in this exhibition are comprised of elements of geometric abstraction and Minimalism, phrases appropriated from popular song lyrics and social movements, and materials such as beads, metal jingles, sinew, and animal rawhide. Gibson, who is of Choctaw and Cherokee heritage and grew up in major urban centers around the world, draws on these influences in his work to subvert and complicate assumptions about both Native American art and identity.

Shirazeh Houshiary (b. 1955, Iran; lives and works in London) makes paintings, sculpture, and animation that seek to challenge viewers’ perceptions of time, space, and materiality. This exhibition will feature two works by Houshiary: Sheer (2012), a sculpture made from aluminum bricks, and Meander (2016), a pencil and pigment work on canvas. Both works are structured around the “rules” of Minimalism—the reduced color palette, the use of industrial material, the restriction of form, and the engagement with physical space—but they prioritize the viewer’s individualized, sensorial, and intellectual experience. Although constructed according to a predetermined set of conditions, Sheer takes on an organic shape as it twists and grows, creating a sense of movement and fluidity that is antithetical to the material. In Meander, Houshiary uses language as the foundation of her gestures, layering contradictory Arabic phrases such as “I am” and “I am not,” until they become illegible. Provoking a variety of nonverbal and visceral associations, Houshiary’s paintings invite viewers to consider the significance and meaning of each individual gesture.

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